Beth King


Beth King

Beth King, APRN, PMHNP-BC, Associate Professor, was inspired to pursue a career as nursing faculty because it combined several of her passions. While in high school, her father experienced a traumatic brain injury, which caused him to be hospitalized for months. “He survived, and I knew the healthcare profession made a significant difference, so it greatly impacted my education and professional choices.” Additionally, she grew up in a family of educators. “I understood the difference a teacher could make to a student,” she said. “Everyone should have an opportunity to obtain an education.”

Dr. King enjoys helping students who are facing challenges along their educational pathway. She believes in giving students a second chance. “If you want to be a nurse, there is a pathway in education for you to become a nurse. I like to help everyone figure out their path. When they achieve their goal, it is rewarding.” Dr. King primarily teaches students in the psychiatric mental health nurse practitioner program. She strongly believes the field needs individuals who care about the many mental health challenges individuals face daily. “We need students and nurses who really do care about the person.” Her favorite aspect of teaching is helping students understand mental health, which is a component of everyone’s life – from the student to the patient. “We need to be sensitive to it and understand it.” She said caring science, the subject of her dissertation, is embedded in psychiatric nursing, and she enjoys teaching the language of caring science, so students start using that language while caring for their patients.

During the pandemic, Dr. King and her colleagues co-led the development and instruction of a new telehealth certificate course offered to the community. Using funding from the CARES Act, the College purchased telehealth equipment for undergraduate and graduate nursing programs, so students could use the equipment in simulation exercises. Dr. King and staff at the Louis and Anne Green Memory and Wellness Center also purchased iPads and equipment to provide patients with psychotherapy and prevent isolation for elderly participants.